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Toxic Heavy Metals Test

A Comprehensive Look at Heavy Metal Exposure
30-Minute Health Coaching Call Included
Sale

Toxic Heavy Metals Test

A Comprehensive Look at Heavy Metal Exposure
30-Minute Health Coaching Call Included

Do you ever feel like you aren't quite as sharp as you once were? Your brain feels foggy, you experience frequent headaches, low mood or seem to forget things more easily, and you're not sure why? Even if you know you've been exposed, you might not have considered that heavy metals may be to blame for your unexplained challenges. Many people may write off these health issues as part of aging, but high or prolonged exposure to heavy metals like mercury, lead and cadmium, or an imbalance of toxic elements can cause a range of health challenges. By confirming your levels of exposure with a simple at-home lab test, you can finally get the answers you've been searching for.

Test Type:
Urine
Urine

Toxic Element Exposure

What is Measured

Blood Spot Markers

Zinc, Copper, Zinc/Copper Ratio, Magnesium, Selenium, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury

Heavy metals and essential elements are absorbed, circulated and excreted by our body in different ways affecting different systems, so utilizing the appropriate medium - either urine or dried blood spot will provide an accurate picture of the effects of both long term or short term exposure.

  • Blood Spot Copper and Zinc:Reflect overall nutritional status as well as detecting toxicity from excessive levels
  • Zinc/Copper Ratio: As functional antagonists, the zinc/copper ratio is important, especially where values of both border high and low normal ranges
  • Magnesium: Only tested in blood spot as it represents the intracellular magnesium level
  • Selenium: Blood spot reflects long-term selenium intake
  • Cadmium: Blood spot can assess recent exposure to cadmium
  • Lead
  • Mercury: Blood spot reflects organic mercury exposure (usually from seafood), as it is bound to hemoglobin in red blood cells
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Urine Markers

Iodine, Bromine, Selenium, Arsenic, Cadmium, Lithium, and Mercury (Plus Creatinine to Correct for Urine Dilution)

Heavy metals and essential elements are absorbed, circulated and excreted by our body in different ways affecting different systems, so utilizing the appropriate medium - either urine or dried blood spot will provide an accurate picture of the effects of both long term or short term exposure.

  • Iodine: Urine iodine is the best indicator of recent dietary intake, as >90% is eliminated in urine. An essential component of the thyroid hormones (T4 and T3). It is problematic in deficiency or excess due to compromised thyroid hormone production that can lead to pregnancy complications, goiter and decreased cognitive function
  • Bromine
  • Selenium: Recent dietary intake of selenium is indicated by urinary levels
  • Arsenic: Arsenic is rapidly cleared from the bloodstream after exposure, so urine is the most appropriate medium for arsenic testing
  • Cadmium
  • Lithium
  • Mercury: Urinary mercury is the best indicator of inorganic and elemental mercury exposure (e.g., from dental amalgams or skin-lightening creams), since these forms of mercury accumulate in the kidneys.

Plus Creatinine to correct for urine dilution. Creatinine is a metabolic by-product that is excreted at a relatively constant rate as long as kidney function is not impaired. It is used to normalize the amount of elements extracted from the filter paper and to correct for hydration status; the greater the fluid intake, the lower the creatinine level.

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Essential Elements

Iodine, Selenium, Bromine, Copper, Zinc, Lithium, and Magnesium

Essential elements, overall, are only healthy when they are within optimal ranges. Levels too low or too high can have detrimental effects on health. Therefore, it's important to know if essential or toxic elements are outside their expected ranges.

  • Iodine and selenium can be beneficial or toxic, depending on their levels. Deficiency or excess can cause thyroid dysfunction and goiter
  • Bromine is in the same chemical family as iodine and excessive amounts will compete with iodine in the thyroid – becoming particularly problematic when iodine levels are low and bromine is high
  • Copper, zinc, and lithium are essential micronutrients needed in small quantities, and become toxic at higher levels
  • Magnesium is an essential element required for over 600 enzymatic reactions involved in cellular metabolism and protein synthesis
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Toxic Heavy Metals

Arsenic, Mercury, and Cadmium

  • Arsenic, mercury, and cadmium are three of the most toxic heavy metals, according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC)
  • High levels lead to an increase in Reactive Oxygen Species that damage proteins, lipids and DNA
  • They also form tight bonds with the essential element selenium, reducing its bioavailability for enzymes essential for thyroid hormone synthesis and activation
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Comprehensive Results

Featured Reviews

Still have questions? FAQs

Once you receive your at-home lab test, please follow the instructions provided to register your test. Once sample(s) are sent to one of our CLIA certified labs, it will take approximately 3 weeks for your results to be returned, during which time you will receive information on how to schedule your one-one-one health coaching call.

We have compiled thorough FAQs for our at-home lab tests, which you can browse here:
https://faq.equi.life/en-US/articles/lab-kit-faq-14490

For additional questions, you can contact us at support@equi.life.